Wednesday, 7 March 2012

WWG Police Station part 2

As promised on Sunday, here is part two of my review of my World Works Games 28mm scale Mayhem City Police Station. This time, I'll concentrate on the ground floor interior.
This is the overhead view that I left you with last time as a teaser shot. Well, no more teasing. I'll tell you what each of the rooms represents, starting in the top right hand corner and moving around clockwise. First up is a detective's office, followed by a second detective's office. Next is the corridor to the cells. There are four cells, and each one can hold four prisoners. Next, we come to the corridor leading to the rear exit and to the stairs to the first floor. The processing room and identity parade room are side by side. Above them are an interrogation room and a connecting room, which leads to four other rooms. In the top left hand corner is a third detective's office, next to the public toilets and the entrance hall.
Let's take a closer look at the rooms, starting with the pair of detective's offices next to each other. Against the far wall of the office at the top of this photo are a filing cabinet with a computer on top of it, a wall-mounted bookcase and a selection of wanted posters hanging on a wall board. The far wall of the lower office shows a photocopier machine, a fire extinguisher and a large wipe-board.
I did not want each office to look the same, so I rearranged the placement of the furniture in them, even though they all contain common elements. Both have their desks behind a window but due to the placement of the windows the desks are at ninety degrees to each other.
Against the far wall of the office at the top of this photo are a filing cabinet from my Mayhem Industrial set and a bookcase, which this time, I have placed on the floor. As in part one of my review, all furniture items came from the Mayhem Police set, unless I note otherwise. The far wall of the office at the bottom of the above photo shows a large filing cabinet in the corner and on the wall, a poster of Great Cthulhu. Apparently, he has been linked to a number of ritualistic murders. Police advise the public not to approach him!
This photo gives a good overview of the layout of both rooms. They each measure 6" by 3". Nothing more to say, so move along now.
The entrance hall is the second largest room in the building (after the first floor squad room). It measures 9" by 6" but loses a 3" square for the toilets at the bottom right of the above photo. The giant shield mounted on the far wall lets visitors know in no uncertain terms that this is a police station. In the public toilets, the checkered floor came from the TLX Mayhem Armoury set. The two wash basins in the toilets are from the Ebbles Ambient Elements - Barracks set.
You can see that the room is dominated by the huge reception desk, upon which I have placed a computer keyboard and monitor, and a telephone unit. The computer stack stands off to one side of the desk, near the coffee dispensing machine.
I cut out the clock from the entrance wall, glued it to mounting card then stuck it back in place. This gives it a 3D effect, as it sits away from the wall. The two red leather seats either side of the main doors are for the comfort of waiting visitors. The three toilet cubicles came from the same Ebbles set as the wash basins. I suspect that Mel Ebbles aka Christopher Roe never envisaged anyone making them with open and closing doors. But I did, and whilst I realise that the doors should open inwards that was physically impossible and so I had to compromise and make them open outwards.
The short wall by the toilets shows an array of wanted posters, pinned to a board.
Moving ever onwards, we come to a small connecting room with a door in each wall, a small interrogation room and the third detective's office to be found on this floor.
At the top of the picture, in the detective's office are a bookcase with a telephone unit on it, a small filing cabinet and a taller bookcase.
As you'd expect, the interrogation room is very spartan, containing nothing more than a desk and two chairs. In between the two front windows of the detective's office is a photocopier machine.
In the detective's office, a computer keyboard and monitor take up half of the desk. The computer tower sits at the side of the desk next to the wall. I added a motivational poster to the wall behind the desk.
From left to right in this photo are the stairs to the first floor, the processing room, where suspects are photographed, finger-printed and their details entered into the computer. At the far right is the identity parade line-up room. Against the far wall of the processing room is a storage locker from the Ebbles Ambient Elements Workshop set.
The identity parade room contains no furniture. Its two-way mirror is actually a window printed onto transparency paper. In the processing room, the desk and chairs are from the WWG Police set but the other items come from the Ebbles Ambient Elements Workshop set. In the upper left corner is a filing cabinet. In the centre is a computer terminal and in the upper right corner is a workbench.
I'm not exactly sure what a processing room should look like but this set-up looks fine to me and I'm not going to change it now.
Against the far wall of the identity parade room is a height chart stuck to the wall to measure how tall the "usual suspects" are. It can also be used to photograph single suspects against it.
Finally, we come to my cell block. These are the holding cells to retain prisoners before they are transferred to a more secure prison facility. I normally reinforce my walls with mounting board, but I knew that if I did that with the "metal" bars, it would make cutting out the holes a majorly difficult task. So, instead, I reinforced the inner and outer printouts with thin card. The upper walls above the bars are reinforced with mounting board. Even so, cutting out 192 holes was a complete chore. The walls between each cell could also be made of bars but I thought, sod that, and made them brick walls instead!
The eight double bunk beds that occupy the cells came from the Ebbles Ambient Elements Barracks set. The beds that come with the WWG Mayhem Police set are good, but they are only single beds and I wanted my cells to hold twice as many prisoners, which is why I chose the double bunks.
Each cell contains one toilet and one sink unit. The cells measure 4" by 3" each and the corridor leading to them measures 12" by 2".
Many of the cell walls are covered in graffiti, which I like. There was no way that I wanted my cells to look pristine and clean.
And that concludes my tour of my police station. Hopefully, it may inspire you to have a go at making one yourself, but be warned this is not a project for the faint-hearted or novice. The amount of work I put into this project was staggering but I think the end result was worth it. It is a building that I am immensely proud of and I'd like to thank everyone who has left a comment for your kind words.

38 comments:

  1. Even more fecking beautiful, so much to look at and admire, fecking amazing work and not a chance of me ever starting it even though I have the plans at home.....top work Bryan!

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    1. Thanks, Fran. I understand your predicament, because to make something like this will take up a hell of a lot of your spare time. You have to really want to do it before making that kind of commitment.

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  2. Wow, what an amazing terrain piece. It looks like it was worht all the effort (and the amount of effort really shows, 192 holes between bars!).
    Everything looks so good, you will all the other players jealous.
    Can't wait to see a battle that involves Team Vampifan fighting their way through the station.

    Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks, Adam. It took me about four days to cut out all the holes in the cell bars because it got so tedious so quickly! So I made it more manageable by only doing one cell per day.

      I am so looking forward to using this in a scenario.

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  3. Brilliant work, so much to look at and envy. I'll be looking at these pages time and time again.

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    1. Thanks and take your time in looking, Irqan.

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  4. This is simply amazing......

    Now do one more and send to me!!

    Hehe.. Amazing job Bryan. This is not only a centerpiece but also a masterpiece! Thank you for sharing, this is really inspiring!

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    1. I'll knock you one up this weekend, shall I, Johnny? LOL!

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  5. Wow again that is one superb piece of card building! they should give you shares Bryan Far to many little touches here and there to mention. You should be so proud

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    1. Thank you, Simon, and yes, I am proud of this. In fact, more proud of this than of anything else I have made.

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  6. Utterly jaw-dropping Brian. Most excellent. I've been meaning to ask: Are the chairs fixed in position, or are they moveable to great more space for mini's. I imagine you've probably fixed them in place rather than risk losing them.

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    1. Thank you, Lead Legion. Long ago when I started making furniture for my buildings I gave some serious thought to whether I should glue my chairs to the floor or leave them free. It soon became clear that the best option was to glue them in place. Leaving them free, which I did try, caused a right pain in the bum when it came to transporting my buildings. A short journey from upstairs to downstairs sent them flying all over the place. i learnt my lesson from that and nowadays all furniture is glued in place.

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  7. Wow! My eyes are bugging out of my head and my fingers are curled into balls of sympathy pain from cutting out the holes for the jail cells. Once again you have set the bar for paper terrain. What a beautiful job, my friend. I am just blown away by the level of detail in this build. I'm really impressed with the opening doors for the bathroom stalls, what a great touch. Bryan, you are definitely the Man! All of the painstaking cutting and folding, edging. And not only Doing all of that, but doing it perfectly, and kitbashing it as you go along. Another element that really stands out is the stair near the Processing Room. It looks simple but that is deceptive. It's perfect. Straight, aligned, seamless. I never get them like that. :)

    Thanks for sharing this, and for being such an inspiration to gamers and modelers alike. I know I will be coming back to learn from this build over and over. You should start charging admission. :)

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    1. So you like it, huh? LOL! Seriously, many thanks for your warm and enthusiastic comments, Joe. Comments like yours inspire me and give me a reason to do the best I can at all times. Going the extra mile has always been my motto when it comes to card modelling and oh boy, it certainly pays dividends. I must admit that once I got my mojo back, I thoroughly enjoyed making this. As each room got furnished I could see the finishing line getting closer and closer. The nearer it got, the more I wanted to finish it, which kept my enthusiasm going.

      Charging admission? Hmm, perhaps I should have a word with Blogger about that!

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  8. This review really shows how huge that building is. I can imagine cutting all those holes were a bugger, but it is well worth it, amazing work.

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    1. It is a big building, Mathyoo. I'm glad you like it. Once you've mastered the basics of card modelling, this is what you can aspire to.

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  9. great stuff, i hope you do a tutorial on how you make your card buildings. I love the cells, its my favorite room. I hope you make the mega mall sometime, that would be cool

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    1. I'd love to do a tutorial on card modelling. It's something that has been on my "to do" list for a long time now. Also, I'd love to make a huge shopping mall, but I can't see that happening anytime soon. Sorry.

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  10. Basically what everybody else has already said!!! Excellent, excellent with more excellent added on the end!

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  11. Just when I think you cant impress me anymore, INcredible. Congrats on getting it done. If there is one thing better than your talent its your patience. That is one biiiig job. Its really impressive. Thanks for the thrill. I cant wait for a seige :)

    Rog

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    1. Thank you, Roger. You hit upon one important point in the making of this model - patience. My parents always said it was something I had in abundance and it is true. People say that patience is a virtue and there is no way you could have made this without it.

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  12. You are a determined man. with 192 holes staring me down I would have just scratchbuit the bars.
    Cant wait for the next Batrep!

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    1. Once I started cutting out the holes in the bars I did think, what have I let myself in for? But, to be honest, I'm glad I persevered. Determined, you say? Yes, and patient!

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  13. Brilliant work Bryan! After putting so much time and effort into this monster of a project, you should be justifiably proud of the results!

    All hail Vampifan the Great!!!

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    1. Thanks, Colin. I certainly am very proud of what I have achieved here. All the toil and effort was worth it.

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  14. Awesome effort Bryan, that station is just unbelievable, all that effort = massive payout, I stand in awe.

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    1. I love your comment about "massive payout," TE. Thanks.

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  15. Bryan this is an immense achievemtn of which you should most definitely be very proud indeed. It is awesome and a superb addition to your already EPIC collection. Well done and thanks for sharing. A huge inspiration for all of our projects. I can't wait to see it in action!

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    1. Thanks for the kind comment, Adam. I'm sure that when the police station makes its first appearance in a batrep it will be very popular with my followers.

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  16. Blimey that's an incredible model. Su-bleeding-perb!

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    1. Thanks, Phil. As a model maker yourself, I'm sure you can appreciate the work that went into this.

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  17. I know that this comment is late but now I'm starting to catch up. Jaw-dropping awesomeness as usual!!! All the details are spot on and really make the place look real. And I appreciate the amount of work it took you to do all that.

    I have a folder where I keep pics of your interior work. At some future date when I get time and motivation, I'll be using them as a reference for detailing out the interiors of my buildings.

    Once again, words fail...WWG should definitely have a link to your work!

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    1. Comments are never late, Mike, and are always welcome. I am humbled that you keep a folder of my work. Many thanks indeed!

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  18. As I already said:

    Best element of terrain I ever seen.

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  19. Stupid question: what are you using to reinforce the walls? It almost looks like a heavy matte board.

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